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Kuits’ employment expert contributes to government consultation on tribunal reform

15 Mar 2017

Head of Employment for Manchester commercial law firm Kuits, Kevin McKenna, has weighed in on the government’s consultation to reform the employment tribunal system.

Kevin was one of a small number of legal representatives to input into the consultation paper drafted by the Ministry of Justice and the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy, which looks at how the wider principles of court and tribunals reform could be applied to employment tribunals and the Employment Appeal Tribunal.

Insights, comments and concerns put forward by each expert enable ministers to approach the task of amending the Employment Tribunals Act 1996 knowledgably, with the aim of bringing the employment tribunal system in line with the flexibility of the rest of the unified tribunals system, in a way that reflects the diverse needs of employment tribunal and Employment Appeal Tribunal users. The consultation paper can be seen online here.

The government sought advice from a range of thought leaders to produce the white paper, from business, charities and social enterprises, to local government, trade unions and the judiciary. Further secondary legislation will be required to implement these reforms in full.

Kuits’ employment experts are key influencers within the business community and hold quarterly legal update seminars for HR professionals from around Greater Manchester to drive best practice across the profession. The team were recently quoted by several media outlets for their insights into the ‘High heels and workplace dress codes’ report by the Petitions Committee and Women and Equalities Committee of the House of Commons.

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